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Vauxhall


Friday 9th December
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (ocncessions $8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring site of Pleasure Gardens and surrounding neighbourhood. We discover the one surviving building from the Pleasure Gardens and learn why a Church was built with it’s own Art School. There are tangible examples of Victorian philanthropy. We see how the Ragged School survived the widening of the railway. At the end of a hidden alley we find the secret cottage built about 1710. In a rapidly changing bit of London we find plenty that brings the past to life.

Kings Cross


Sunday 11th December
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring the district re-named in the 1830’s after a short-lived statue as an early form of regeneration. As well as arguably the finest railway station in London there are Former horse-bus stables, a Victorian horse-cab factory and London’s first Gin Palace. Along the way we encounter the secret life of the Scala Cinema, the Light-house and Plum Pudding Steps. Through it all runs the now buried River Fleet. We see how a lost river has left it’s mark on the 21st century.

Kennington


Saturday 10th December
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring this neighbourhood that was once a royal manor. We see what became of the Common, popular with preachers and protestors. There was a significant Chartists meeting on April 10th 1848. We see what was built on the site of the County gallows. Amidst many fine 18th and 19th century houses we find south London’s first Georgian square. Hidden away sometimes not so hidden we discover some fascinating buildings including the Vestry hall, an old smithy and a public library designed by the same architect responsible for the Tate Gallery.


You want to get out and about in those magical days between Christmas and New Year but don’t want to go to the sales? An old map walk might be just what you are looking for.

Each one starts at 12 noon and lasts about two hours
Cost £10 (ocncessions £8) per head.
To book email Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Wednesday 28th December
Fitzrovia
Walk with old maps exploring London’s one-time bohemian district, where many well known artist and writers lived. The area was built up in the second half of the 18th century so we find many splendid Georgian houses including the last one by Robert Adam. We see the first London house where Charles Dickens lived (not Doughty Street) and a few doors along the Workhouse that inspired Oliver Twist. Along the way we encounter Virginia Woolf, Dylan Thomas and Samuel Morse.

Thursday 29th December
North Lambeth
Walk with old maps exploring a slice of this ancient parish. We see what’s left of the former Workhouse and the Casual Ward, not so well known but an important part of the Workhouse. Then there’s an open air pulpit where costermongers once plied their trade and the old slipper baths now occupied by a doctor’s surgery. We find beautiful artisan houses, with semi-basements from the 1830’s, several streets of them, it’s like going back in time. An obscure plaque unlocks the mystery of another parish within this one.

Friday 30th December
Blackfriars
Walk with old maps exploring the winding lanes between St Paul’s and the Thames. Site of a Dominican Monastery until the Reformation. Along a narrow medieval street we discover a house built by Christopher Wren, better known for his churches. Down an almost hidden alley we find houses built after the Great Fire and discover what was there before. Along the way we encounter Inigo Jones, William Shakespeare and the Friends of Friendless Churches