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Bermondsey


Saturday 18th March
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring the byways and hidden corners around Bermondsey Street. Traces of the leather trade as well as a former smithy and clog factory. 17th century houses where you least expect to find them.The Victorian Police station and at the other end of the street it’s 1812 predecessor. The former mission hall that served the slum dwellers and across the street the glorious flats funded by philanthropy that replaced the slums in 1897. Our perambulation ends by an unlikely fragment of Bermondsey Abbey,in it’s day second only to Westminster Abbey.

Vauxhall


Saturday 4th March
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring site of Pleasure Gardens and surrounding neighbourhood. We discover the one surviving building from the Pleasure Gardens and learn why a Church was built with it’s own Art School. There are tangible examples of Victorian philanthropy. We see how the Ragged School survived the widening of the railway. At the end of a hidden alley we find the secret cottage built about 1710. In a rapidly changing bit of London we find plenty that brings the past to life.

Fitzrovia


Sunday 26th February
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 0am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring London’s one-time bohemian district, where many well known artist and writers lived. The area was built up in the second half of the 18th century so we find many splendid Georgian houses including the last one by Robert Adam. We see the first London house where Charles Dickens lived (not Doughty Street) and a few doors along the Workhouse that inspired Oliver Twist. Along the way we encounter Virginia Woolf, Dylan Thomas and Samuel Morse.

Kings Cross


Sunday 9th April
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring the district re-named in the 1830’s after a short-lived statue as an early form of regeneration. As well as arguably the finest railway station in London there are Former horse-bus stables, a Victorian horse-cab factory and London’s first Gin Palace. Along the way we encounter the secret life of the Scala Cinema, the Light-house and Plum Pudding Steps. Through it all runs the now buried River Fleet. We see how a lost river has left it’s mark on the 21st century.

Rotherhithe Docks


Saturday 25th February
12 noon lasts about three hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.cp.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Note: This old map walk is a bit longer than usual so we have a stop for refreshments and a loo break. More than that we visit Holy Trinity Church’s open day. It’s Rotherhithe’s best kept secret

Wall with old maps tracing and exploring the docks and shipyards that once made up this neck of the woods. You can be forgiven for thinking they all disappeared following closure and re-development. We find fragments often in unlikely places and one complete though no longer working shipyard. Along the way we see what became of the condemned hole, encounter an old map where you least expect to find one and find a rare wooden headstone.

Marylebone


Sunday 12th March
11am lasts about two hours
£10 (concessions £8)
Book by emailing Ken at oldmapken@yahoo.co.uk
you will be notified of meeting place on booking
Latest bookings 9am morning of the tour

Walk with old maps exploring from where Marylebone began to where Octavia Hill began her work. Signs of an ancient conduit then Lord Harley’s Estate where we see Robert Adam’s first and most distinctive London house. The lost River Tyburn is never far away and leaves it’s mark on the topography. Down an almost hidden alley we discover tenements built to replace slums and the Ragged School that served the slums. Along the way we encounter Katherine Mansfield, Edwin Lutyens and J M W Turner